25 years of TCP/IP

Google logoOn the 1st of jan 2008 I saw a new logo of google as expected I thought they would be wishing new year to all the googlers but the unexpected came when I clicked on it. I found out that they were celebrating 25 years of TCP/IP which is a bigger thing for celebration and I decided to find out some facts about TCP/IP, from one of the most reliable sources on the internet (Wikipedia) which I’d like to share with you.

In the 1950s and early 1960s, prior to the widespread inter-networking that led to the Internet, most communication networks were limited by their nature to only allow communications between the stations on the network. Some networks had gateways or bridges between them, but these bridges were often limited or built specifically for a single use. One prevalent computer networking method was based on the central mainframe method, simply allowing its terminals to be connected via long leased lines. This method was used in the 1950s by Project RAND to support researchers such as Herbert Simon, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, when collaborating across the continent with researchers in Santa Monica, California, on automated theorem proving and artificial intelligence.

With so many different network methods, something was needed to unify them. Robert E. Kahn of DARPA(Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) and ARPANET (The ARPANET, developed by DARPA ) recruited Vint Cerf of Stanford University to work with him on the problem. By 1973, they had soon worked out a fundamental reformulation, where the differences between network protocols were hidden by using a common internetwork protocol, and instead of the network being responsible for reliability, as in the ARPANET, the hosts became responsible. Cerf credits Hubert Zimmerman, Gerard LeLann and Louis Pouzin (designer of the CYCLADES network) with important work on this design.

At this time, the earliest known use of the term Internet was by Vinton Cerf, who wrote:
“ Specification of Internet Transmission Control Program. ”

With the role of the network reduced to the bare minimum, it became possible to join almost any networks together, no matter what their characteristics were, thereby solving Kahn’s initial problem. DARPA agreed to fund development of prototype software, and after several years of work, the first somewhat crude demonstration of a gateway between the Packet Radio network in the SF Bay area and the ARPANET was conducted. On November 22, 1977 a three network demonstration was conducted including the ARPANET, the Packet Radio Network and the Atlantic Packet Satellite network—all sponsored by DARPA. Stemming from the first specifications of TCP in 1974, TCP/IP emerged in mid-late 1978 in nearly final form. By 1981, the associated standards were published as RFCs 791, 792 and 793 and adopted for use. DARPA sponsored or encouraged the development of TCP/IP implementations for many operating systems and then scheduled a migration of all hosts on all of its packet networks to TCP/IP. On 1 January 1983, TCP/IP protocols became the only approved protocol on the ARPANET, replacing the earlier NCP protocol.

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5 thoughts on “25 years of TCP/IP

  1. […] Posted by sushant kumar on January 1, 2008 On the 1st of jan 2007 I saw a new logo of google as expected I thought they would be wishing new year to all the googlers but the unexpected came when I clicked on it. I found out that they were celebrating 25 years of TCP/IP which is a bigger thing for celebration and I decided to find out some facts about TCP/IP, from one of the most reliable sources on the internet (Wikipedia) which I’d like to share with you. Read more » […]

  2. On the 1st of jan 2007 I saw a new logo of google as expected I thought they would be wishing new year to all the googlers but the unexpected came when I clicked on it.

    You mean:
    On the 1st of jan 2008 I saw a new logo of google as expected I thought they would be wishing new year to all the googlers but the unexpected came when I clicked on it.

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